Archive for the ‘Income Tax’ category

Drafting your Last Will and Testament – You May Delay, but Time Will Not

May 8, 2013

 By Rose Wilson

You may have heard stories in the news recently about Roman Blum, the multi-millionaire from New York who died without a will, leaving an estate of $40 million without any named beneficiaries.  Today, almost a year and a half from the date of his death, it is possible that the money will stay in the hands of the state government as none of his heirs have been found.

Many people procrastinate when it comes to completing their estate planning, but what happens if you die without a will?  A common misconception is that the government will receive your assets.  In reality, the answer to this question depends on the “intestacy” law of the state in which you reside at the time of your death.  To die “intestate” means to die without a will.  When this occurs, the identity of your heirs will be determined by state law, and intestacy laws vary from state to state.

In the state of Georgia, the intestacy law generally provides for distribution of the estate in the following order.  If you are married and have no children at the time of your death, your spouse will receive all of your assets.  If you are married with children at the time of your death, then your spouse and your children share the estate in equal shares, although your spouse will receive at least one-third of the estate.  If you die unmarried and without descendants, then your property will pass in equal shares to your nearest living relatives (parents, then siblings if your parents are not alive, then your nieces and nephews, and continuing out along the family lines according to degree of kinship).

In the event that you die intestate and no heirs can be identified, then your estate will remain with the government.  The scenario in which an individual has no heirs seems unlikely because one must have a living relative somewhere on the planet.  The real trouble comes in identifying the heirs, but cases where no heirs can be identified are uncommon.

What if your heir under state law is your third cousin twice removed, whom you barely know, and you prefer that your money go to friends or charity?  Then you must sign a will to make that happen.  Whether you’re a multi-millionaire like Roman Blum, or simply an average Joe, a last will and testament may be one of the most important legal documents you will ever prepare.  Not only does it provide for the disposition of your assets in the manner that you desire, it can provide numerous other benefits to your estate beneficiaries, such as asset protection, tax savings, and more.

IRS Guidance Anticipated for Tax Effects of Trust Decanting

January 25, 2012

 By Rose Drupiewski

The IRS announced that it would place the issue of trust “decanting” on its priority list of items to focus on in 2011 and 2012 for purposes of providing taxpayer guidance.   Decanting occurs when a trustee, pursuant to authority provided in the trust agreement or under state law, transfers property from one trust to another.  Decanting powers have recently become popular with trust drafters as a way to provide additional flexibility to trustees when managing trust assets on behalf of beneficiaries.

The reason for the popularity of decanting powers is that such powers can provide flexibility to otherwise inflexible irrevocable trust agreements.  For example, if a trust agreement provides for an outright distribution of assets to a trust beneficiary at age 25 and the trustee has determined that the beneficiary lacks enough maturity at that age to handle a large distribution, the trustee could (if permitted under the trust agreement or state law) transfer the assets to another trust for the benefit of such beneficiary that will not terminate at age 25 but at a later date.

Although decanting can be extremely useful from the standpoint of flexibility, such flexibility may come with undesirable tax consequences.  The gift, estate, GST and income tax consequences of decanting are less than clear.  For example, there has been some concern that the presence of a decanting power may transform an otherwise irrevocable trust into a revocable trust for estate tax purposes, thus causing the assets in the trust to be included in the grantor’s gross estate.  This is obviously an undesirable consequence because many irrevocable trusts are created for the purpose of enabling a grantor to make gifts to family members in trust without causing estate tax inclusion.  There is also some concern as to whether, if the trustee is a beneficiary of the trust, the trustee’s decanting power might be deemed a general power of appointment for estate tax purposes, which might cause unwanted estate tax consequences for the trustee.  These are just a few examples of multiple unresolved gift, estate, GST and income tax issues relating to trust decanting powers.  Because of the lack of clarity regarding the tax effects of decanting and the hope for favorable guidance, the IRS’s announcement is welcome news for many tax planners and their clients.

In connection with the IRS priority plan, the IRS has recently requested comments from the general public regarding the tax implications of decanting powers.  Comments should be submitted to the IRS by April 25, 2012.

Jingle Bells or Ringing Out the Year Gone By – Time Is Short to Complete Annual Planning

November 14, 2011

 by Jeff Waddell

Each year at this time our section of the office begins to get really busy.  Clients we have reached out to all year but who have not responded suddenly begin appearing.  Yes, its year end annual gifting time.  Pay heed to the sounds of the approaching holiday season, for in all the merriment those sounds signal the last days to take advantage of annual exclusion gifting or the last opportunity to capture a loss to offset a gain in the same tax year.

Take the opportunity to be proactive.  Review what you have done and what can, or should, be done before year-end.  Be aware that the annual gifting exclusion for each individual is currently $13,000.  Consider consulting your accountant (now is a relatively quiet period for them) to determine whether you are likely to experience an unpleasant April surprise on your tax bill and if so what might help offset that unwanted occurrence.  Then give your estate planning attorney a call to discuss what needs to occur before year end.

Just as with holiday giving, estate planning gifts come in all shapes and sizes.  Annual gifting is something, as the name implies, to consider every year.  This year and next, unless and until the law changes, larger opportunities exist than ever before in the gifting arena (with lifetime $5 million dollar gifting exemptions) so, if your current financial situation allows, consider making it a truly memorable holiday season for yourself and your loved ones.

When Bad Things Happen to Good Charities: Dealing with Automatic Revocation of Exemption

August 3, 2011

 By Rose Drupiewski

For many years, small charities with gross income falling under certain levels were not required to file annual returns with the IRS. However, beginning in 2007, all charities are now required to provide certain information to the IRS on an annual basis. Small charities that were previously exempt from filing annual information returns with the IRS must now file Form 990-N, also called the e-postcard, which is simply a short electronic notice to the IRS providing the organization’s name, address, and other identifying information. Congress made another change in the law providing the muscle to enforce these new reporting requirements: beginning in 2007, the IRS is required to revoke the exempt status of any charity that has failed to satisfy its information reporting requirements for three consecutive years.

The first wave of revocations recently hit the charitable shore, as this summer the IRS sent hundreds of thousands of notices to charities informing them that their exemptions were automatically revoked for failure to file returns. Most of the charities receiving revocation notices have been small charities that were unaware of the new reporting requirements, leaving many of them wondering how to deal with this unexpected burden.

Fortunately for small charities, the IRS has provided guidance as to how charities can reinstate their federal tax exemptions. For small charities, the IRS allows a simpler reinstatement process and a reduced application fee of $100. It is possible to obtain a retroactive reinstatement of exemption, thus ensuring seamless exemption coverage. Small charities that wish to apply for reinstatement of their tax exemptions can obtain information about the application process from the IRS website, with specific procedural requirements set forth in IRS Notice 2011-43.