Posted tagged ‘President Obama’

President Obama’s Estate Plan Reminds Us of the Power of the Annual Exclusion

April 17, 2012

 by David Kovsky

On April 13, 2012, The Washington Free Beacon ran an article deriding President Obama’s reliance Section 2503(b) of the Internal Revenue Code to transfer $48,000 to his daughters, free of any federal wealth transfer taxes.  Under that section of the Code, each taxpayer may transfer $10,000 to any number of individuals on an annual basis, free of the federal gift tax.  This is the so-called “annual exclusion.”  Section 2503(b) further provides that the annual exclusion will be indexed for inflation.  As such, the amount that may be transferred to each donee in 2012, free of the federal gift tax, is $13,000.”

The rationale behind the annual exclusion is to not mire the taxpayer or the IRS in tracking the aggregate of annual birthday presents, holiday gifts or dinners on “mom and dad.”  Only when the amount rises to the level of what is deemed wealth transfer, will the gift tax be triggered.

Although the article run by The Washington Free Beacon had a political slant, it is also a great reminder of how useful the annual exclusion can be from an estate planning perspective.  Take, for example, the following hypothetical:  Grandmom and Grandpop have three married children and six grandchildren.  By utilizing the annual exclusion, Grandmom and Grandpop can transfer an aggregate of $312,000 of wealth to Generation 2 and Generation 3, without incurring a gift tax or a generation-skipping transfer tax (another federal wealth transfer tax with its own set of annual exclusion rules), every single year.  If these gifts are made in December of year 1 and January of year 2, our hypothetical Grandmom and Grandpop can transfer over $600,000 during a several week period, free of any federal wealth transfer taxes.  Here is breakdown of the transfers in year 1 (which may be replicated in year 2):

Donee:

Grandmom

Grandpop:

Child 1

$13,000

$13,000

Spouse 1

$13,000

$13,000

Child 2

$13,000

$13,000

Spouse 1

$13,000

$13,000

Child 3

$13,000

$13,000

Spouse 3

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 1

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 2

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 3

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 4

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 5

$13,000

$13,000

Grandchild 6

$13,000

$13,000

TOTAL:

$156,000

$156,000

This type of estate planning could be as simple as writing checks to all of your immediate family.  However, for many clients, these transfers should be made in conjunction with the establishment of a specially designed trust that qualifies for the annual exclusion and assists clients in meeting their goals of providing the children (and grandchildren) with a measure of asset management assistance, creditor protection and future transfer tax savings.

In whatever form it takes, outright transfers or in trust, fully utilizing the annual exclusion is a powerful estate planning tool that is often overlooked.

Intentionally Defective Budget Proposal: President Obama’s Attack on Grantor Trusts

February 21, 2012

 By Erica Opitz

On February 13, 2012, President Obama proposed the budget for 2013.  The budget proposal has been reported to be dead on arrival.  Notably, however, President Obama’s budget proposal went after intentionally defective grantor trusts, which is not a proposal that we have seen previously.  If this were to pass, the results would wreak havoc on a top estate planning tool. With the sun setting of the current estate tax code provisions at the end of this year, it is possible that President Obama’s grantor trust proposal will be used as a bargaining chip and could potentially reappear in future legislation.

Under the proposal, the legislation would only be effective for transfers on or after the date of enactment.  As a result, transfers to a grantor trust prior to enactment would remain outside of the grantor’s estate.  For this reason, it is important to take advantage of the grantor trust while the benefits remain available.

Current Law:

In an intentionally defective grantor trust, the grantor retains certain rights and powers over the property held by the trust.  For income tax purposes, a grantor trust is not a separate entity from the grantor, and as a result, the grantor pays all income taxes on the trust earnings.  Under the current regime, the assets placed in the grantor trust are held outside of the grantor’s estate.  The transfer of property into the trust is treated as a completed gift for estate and gift tax purposes.  As a result, future appreciation on the assets placed in the trust is not subject to estate or gift tax.  Furthermore, a sale from the grantor to the grantor trust is ignored for income tax purposes.

Proposed Law:

President Obama’s budget proposal would include the assets of the grantor trust in the grantor’s gross estate.  Additionally, any distributions from a grantor trust would be subject to gift tax as would the assets of the trust if the grantor ceased to be the owner of the trust.  President Obama’s proposal would apply income tax to a sale from the grantor to the grantor trust if the sale would be subject to capital gains tax if the sale was made by someone other than the grantor.  The Department of Treasury’s green book states the reasoning behind the proposal.  “Taxpayers should be required to take consistent positions in dealing with the Internal Revenue Service.  The basis of property acquired from a decedent generally is the fair market value of the property on the decedent’s date of death.”